Day 14: Milwaukee Day Lager

Day 14: Company Brewing Milwaukee Day Lager – Helles Lager 4.14% ABV

About the Beer:

Company Brewing describes themselves as a hardworking community hub, that houses a brewery. Located in the heart of Riverwest, they have cemented themselves as not just a neighborhood fixture with great beer, but space that promotes creativity, art, community, and civic engagement. Whether they are hosting a performance from a local artist, a community forum, or using their space for community events like Riverwest 24, Company Brewing seeks to make an impact in a positive way. 

A few years ago they started brewing a beer called Milwaukee Day Lager to be enjoyed while celebrating Milwaukee’s made up holiday, Milwaukee Day, observed on the fourteenth of April each year. Milwaukee day was created because of the resemblance between the city’s area code, 414, and the date on that fourteenth day of April, 4/14. Though silly in its inception, Milwaukee day is part of a greater movement in our city to help improve Milwaukee’s image both internally and externally. Milwaukee Day Lager is a Helles style lager that uses German Pilsner and Vienna malts to give a straw colored appearance when poured into a glass, while the Hallertau hops help balance out the grains. The aromas are of the cereal grains used in the malt, which is common for a lager style beer. The taste is likewise dominated by the malt. Couple that with the light bodied mouthfeel and the result is one drinkable beer. Though we may be five months early, tonight let’s raise our glasses in salute to Milwaukee and the wonderful beer it is producing these days!

Cheers to the Great Place on a Great Lake,

Chase

Advent Reflection

ScriptureLuke 1:5-10

In the time of Herod king of Judea there was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the priestly division of Abijah; his wife Elizabeth was also a descendant of Aaron. Both of them were righteous in the sight of God, observing all the Lord’s commands and decrees blamelessly. But they were childless because Elizabeth was not able to conceive, and they were both very old. Once when Zechariah’s division was on duty and he was serving as priest before God, he was chosen by lot, according to the custom of the priesthood, to go into the temple of the Lord and burn incense. And when the time for the burning of incense came, all the assembled worshipers were praying outside.

Advent, the season of waiting, is one of my favorite times of the year. Not only because I can enjoy good beer like the 414 Lager tonight, but also because I find myself intentionally slowing down a lot more than I am normally accustomed to. I am currently listening to a Taize song called “Wait For the Lord“, and as it repeatedly chants in beautiful harmony, my soul is lifted up in hope. Waiting is hard, especially when the waiting seems unending. Kind of like this pandemic we are in. We we are waiting for life to get back to normal and I’ve heard so often of people excited to turn the calendar to 2021. “2020 was so hard, a year like none other. I can’t wait until 2021.” But I wonder, will we still be waiting? When Milwaukee Day rolls around in 2021, will we still be in waiting for this longing for normalcy? The season of Advent reminds us that waiting, though difficult to do, is needed. It’s meant to remind us to tune our hearts to wait for something that is truly satisfying and healing: the coming Messiah!

Our passage tonight hones in on John the Baptist’s parents; Zechariah and Elizabeth. They certainly understood what it felt like to wait and to have a longing unfulfilled for a long time. Although both were from priestly lines, and lived righteous and blameless before the Lord, Elizabeth was unable to have children. The text tells us that they were ‘very old’, which indicates that they waited for this hope of a child to be fulfilled for a very long time. In the waiting, they were blessed. Blessed with not only a child, but one that would “Prepare the way for the Lord, the coming Messiah!”

As we wait, wait in hope. Wait in anticipation. Embrace the waiting.

Grace and peace,

robert